Fear Free Visits

We always want your dogs and cats to feel comfortable coming to our clinic. We know some pets become really anxious and stressed about visits to the vet. It doesn’t have to be this way. Please take a look at these tips that have helped some of our patients have a better experience and be sure to talk to our staff and veterinarians about helping your pet have a fear free visit with us.

Heather & Mr. Orange

Is your cat scared to go to the vet?  Here are some tips:

1.  Use a soft sided carrier that also doubles as a cat bed.  A top that zips open is very helpful for both loading and unloading.  Leave the carrier out as much as possible so your cat doesn’t associate the carrier with going to the vet.  At least a week or two is ideal.  If your cat likes treats or cat nip start putting those things in the carrier.  Once in our office we may be able to examine your cat in his or her comfortable carrier.

2. Use Feliway spray or towel in the carrier. Don’t spray directly on your cat. We have Feliway single use towels you may pick up ahead of time or use once you get here.

3.  Pick up a sedative for your cat.  Call the office and we can prescribe a mild, safe sedative.  Sprinkle the capsule on some yummy canned food or give your cat a pill pocket containing the capsule.  Other treats that can be used are yogurt, cheese, or tuna to disguise the sedative. Remove food about 8 hours prior to the visit so that your kitty is hungry.  Administer the sedative two to three hours prior to visit.  

4.  Cover the carrier with a towel during the car ride.  

5. We can administer additional sedatives if needed once you arrive.

 

Ollie

Is your dog scared to go to the vet?  Here are some tips that can help:

1.  Withhold food for 12 hours prior to your visit*.  That way your dog will be much more likely to take treats at our office and have a good experience. If you have special treats that are particularly appealing to your dog or your dog is on a limited ingredient diet feel free to bring these with you. We have hypoallergenic treats available.

2. Acclimate your pet at home to wearing a basket muzzle or e-collar if these things have been useful during past visits.

3.  Feel free to call ahead to obtain a mild, safe sedative if your dog is nervous.

4.  For dogs that are afraid to come into the clinic at all….please practice coming into the lobby as much as you can to desensitize your dog.  Weather allowing, we may be able to examine your dog outside.

Fremont_Vet_Onsite0051

5.  We can administer additional sedatives if needed at the clinic. 

6.  Feel free to stay in your car if coming into the lobby and waiting makes your dog more anxious; or if your dog doesn’t get along with other dogs. Call us when you arrive and we will call or text you when you can come directly into a room instead of waiting in the lobby.

*Don’t with hold food from pets who are diabetics or have other medical conditions which preclude fasting or for puppies less than 16 weeks old.

Thanks!

Dr. Yvonne Roberts

Dr. Yvonne Roberts and the staff and doctors at Fremont Vet